Catholic News

Alessandro Gisotti, interim Vatican spokesman, Boston Cardinal Sean P. O'Malley, president of the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors, and Cardinal Blase J. Cupich of Chicago attend a media briefing Feb. 22, 2019, the second day of the Vatican meeting on the protection of minors in the church. (CNS photo/Paul Haring) See SUMMIT-CUPICH and SUMMIT-GRACIAS Feb. 22, 2019.

Harming a child must be ‘line in the sand’ for removal, cardinal says

For the Catholic Church, there is a "line in the sand," which can never be crossed, and that is to not allow anyone who harms or would harm a child to exercise public ministry, said Cardinal Sean P. O'Malley of Boston.

Prelates attend the opening session of the meeting on the protection of minors in the church at the Vatican Feb. 21, 2019. (CNS photo/Evandro Inetti, pool) See SUMMIT-POPE-TAGLE Feb. 21, 2019.

Clericalism, abuse of power, at heart of sex abuse crisis, cardinal says

The abuse crisis in the Catholic Church is a call for bishops to unmask the deep-seated clericalism that placed protection of the institution of the church above the sufferings of victims, said the head of the council of Latin American bishops.

Catholic News Service

Francesco Cesareo, chairman of the National Review Board, is pictured in an Oct. 10, 2018, photo. Laypeople must be involved in a "more meaningful and influential role" to help Catholic bishops create "an environment of safety within the church," Cesareo said in an opinion piece published by The Boston Globe. (CNS photo/Bob Roller) See CESAREO-LAITY-ABUSE-RESPONSE Feb. 21, 2019.

Cesareo urges greater role for laity in church’s response to abuse

Laypeople must be involved in a "more meaningful and influential role" to help Catholic bishops create "an environment of safety within the church," the chairman of the National Review Board said in an opinion piece published by The Boston Globe.

Catholic News Service

Pope Francis prays during the opening session of the meeting on the protection of minors in the church at the Vatican Feb. 21, 2019. (CNS photo/Evandro Inetti, pool) See SUMMIT-POPE-TAGLE Feb. 21, 2019.

Vatican summit opens with acknowledgement of evil committed

Opening the Vatican summit on child protection and the clerical sexual abuse crisis, Pope Francis said, "The holy people of God are watching and are awaiting from us not simple, predictable condemnations, but concrete and effective measures" to stop abuse.

Catholic News Service

Protesters walk near a construction site of the Atlantic Sunrise pipeline in Holtwood, Pa., Nov. 18, 2017. The U.S. Supreme Court declined Feb. 19, 2019, to hear an appeal by the Adorers of the Blood of Christ that their religious freedom was being violated by the construction of the pipeline through their land in Columbia, Pa. (CNS photo/Stephanie Keith, Reuters) See ADORERS-SCOTUS-RELIGIOUS-FREEDOM Feb. 20, 2019.

Pipeline struggle reveals value of community to religious congregation

For the Adorers of the Blood of Christ, the U.S. Supreme Court's decision not to hear the order's religious freedom claims in a legal challenge to a natural gas pipeline through their land in Pennsylvania came as no real surprise.

Catholic News Service

Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio of Brooklyn, N.Y., celebrates a Mass of hope and healing for victims of sex abuse April 26, 2017, at St. Anselm Church in the Bay Ridge section of Brooklyn. Assisting Bishop DiMarzio is Deacon Philip Franco, a survivor of clergy sex abuse. (CNS photo/Gregory A. Shemitz) See ABUSE-LIST-BROOKLYN Feb. 19, 2019.

Brooklyn’s list covers diocese’s 166 years, has 108 credible abuse claims

The Diocese of Brooklyn released a list of clergy credibly accused of sexually abusing a minor, saying that the 108 names on the list represent less than 5 percent of clergy who have served in the diocese.

Catholic News Service

Irma J. Locasia holds a photo of her son Salvador J. Locasia Jr. in Manila, Philippines, Feb. 13, 2019. Her son was killed in a police operation on this street Aug. 31, 2016, a victim of the war on drugs of President Rodrigo Duterte. (CNS photo/Paul Jeffrey) See PHILIPPINES-BISHOP-DAVID-DRUGS Feb. 19, 2019.

Philippine bishop: Duterte’s drug war is ‘illegal, immoral and anti-poor’

A Catholic bishop in the Philippines said his government's controversial war on drugs is really a war against the country's poor.

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Archbishop Charles J. Scicluna of Malta and Cardinal Blase J. Cupich of Chicago, members of the organizing committee for the Feb. 21-24 Vatican meeting on the protection of minors in the church, attend a press conference to preview the meeting at the Vatican Feb. 18, 2019. Also pictured is Alessandro Gisotti, interim Vatican spokesman. (CNS photo/Paul Haring) See VATICAN-ABUSE-PRESS Feb. 18, 2019.

Vatican summit: Silence, denial are unacceptable, archbishop says

When presented with an accusation that a priest has sexually abused a child, "whether it's criminal or malicious complicity and a code of silence or whether it is denial" on a very human level, such reactions are no longer tolerable, said the Vatican's top investigator of abuse cases.

Catholic News Service

Then-Cardinal Theodore E. McCarrick, retired archbishop of Washington, arrives in procession for a Mass of thanksgiving for Cardinal Donald W. Wuerl of Washington in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican Nov. 22, 2010. (CNS photo/Paul Haring) See POPE-MCCARRICK-REMOVAL Feb. 16, 2019.

McCarrick removed from the priesthood after being found guilty of abuse

Pope Francis has confirmed the removal from the priesthood of Theodore E. McCarrick, the 88-year-old former cardinal and archbishop of Washington.

Catholic News Service

A Dominican nun and Jesuit priest are pictured in a combination photo. "Pope Francis rightly attacks the culture of clericalism which has hindered our fight against abuse and indeed is one of the root causes," said a statement Feb. 19 from the women's International Union of Superiors General and the men's Union of Superiors General. (CNS file) See SUMMIT-RELIGIOUS-SUPERIORS Feb 19, 2019.

Religious superiors admit denial, slowness to act against abuse

Twisted ideas of power and authority in the Catholic Church have contributed to the clerical sexual abuse crisis, leaders of religious orders said, but sometimes the positive "sense of family" in their own communities also made them slow to act.

Catholic News Service